Bridge End Garden in Saffron Walden / November 2015

Bridge End Garden is a group of seven interlinked 19th-century gardens.

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Ships from Gdynia, Poland / August 2015

For those who does not know:

Gdynia

Gdynia is a city in the Pomeranian Voivodeship of Poland and an important seaport of Gdańsk Bay on the south coast of the Baltic Sea. Located in Kashubia in Eastern Pomerania, Gdynia is part of a conurbation with the spa town of Sopot, the city of Gdańsk and suburban communities, which together form a metropolitan area called the Tricity (Trójmiasto), with a population of over a million people.

For centuries, Gdynia remained a small agricultural and fishing village on the Baltic coast. At the beginning of the 20th-century Gdynia became a seaside resort town and experienced an inflow of tourists. This also triggered an increase in local population. After Poland regained its independence in 1918, a decision was made to construct a Polish seaport in Gdynia, between the Free City of Danzig (a semi-autonomous city-state under joint League of Nations and Polish administration) and German Pomerania, making Gdynia the primary economic hub of the Polish Corridor. It was then that the town was given a more cosmopolitan character with modernism being the dominant architectural style and emerged as a city in 1926.

The rapid development of Gdynia was interrupted by the outbreak of World War II. Although the German troops refrained from deliberate bombing, the newly built port and shipyard were completely destroyed. The population of the city suffered much heavier losses as most of the inhabitants were evicted and expelled. The locals were either displaced to other regions of occupied Poland or sent to Nazi concentration camps throughout Europe. After the war, Gdynia was settled with the former inhabitants of Warsaw and lost cities such as Lviv and Vilnius in the Eastern Borderlands. The city was gradually regenerating itself with its shipyard being rebuilt and expanded. In December 1970 the shipyard workers protest against the increase of prices was bloodily repressed. This greatly contributed to the rise of the Solidarity movement in Gdańsk.

Today the port of Gdynia is a regular stopover on the itinerary of luxurious passenger ships and a new ferry terminal with a civil airport are under realisation. The city won numerous awards in relation to safety, infrastructure, quality of life and a rich variety of tourist attractions. In 2013 Gdynia was ranked as Poland’s best city to live in and topped the rankings in the overarching category of general quality of life.[2] Gdynia is also highly noted for its access to education. There are prestigious universities such as the Polish Naval Academy located nearby.

Gdynia hosts the Gdynia Film Festival, the main Polish film festival, and was the venue for the International Random Film Festival in 2014.

[Source: Wikipedia]

It was my first visit in Gdynia and first try with ship shots xd

Enjoy 🙂

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Scarborough, Yorkshire / June 2015

Scarborough is a town on the North Sea coast of North Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the North Riding of Yorkshire, the town lies between 10–230 feet (3–70 m) above sea level, rising steeply northward and westward from the harbour on to limestone cliffs. The older part of the town lies around the harbour and is protected by a rocky headland.

With a population of just over 61,000, Scarborough is the largest holiday resort on the Yorkshire coast. The town has fishing and service industries, including a growing digital and creative economy, as well as being a tourist destination. People who live in the town are known as Scarborians.

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Kourion Archeological site, Limassol, Cyprus / September 2017

Kourion archaeological site is located on the west coast of Limassol in the small town of Episkopi.

Kourion was an ancient city to the southwest shores of Cyprus and it is one of the most famous ancient attractions here in Cyprus and it is situated 18km west of Limassol. Kourion is renowned for its importance, as historical sources suggest it was a major ancient city Kingdom of Cyprus.Herodotos and Stravonas both mention that it was a colony of the Argion, one of the most rich and powerful kingdoms of Cyprus. It is mentioned in the “prism of Asarhadon” 673-672B.C along with other kingdoms in Cyprus (Idalion, Kition , Salamina , Hitri, Tamasso,Lidra and Soloi). According to mythology, the well-known owner of Kourion was Curieus the son of Kiniras. The residents called him Curieus and Curias.

The town of Kourion is well known for its mosaics which decorate the floors in magnificent mansions and yards. One of the most well-known mansions is the house of Achilles, with a variety of mosaics on the floors. It is dated to the 4th century A.D and it took its name from the Greek hero of mythology.

 

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The ancient Kourion Theatre

The ancient Kourion theatre is located at the most southern part of town. It was built during the end of the 2nd century B.C but it has been altered to its dimensions which are found today, during the 2nd century A.D. It has a capacity of 3.500 spectators and a majestic view towards the Mediterranean. The theatre was closed towards the north, however only ruins are found today. To the left and right of the stage there are two arched pathways from which the viewers would enter.

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Kolossi Castle, Cyprus / September 2017

Kolossi castle was initially constructed in the 13th century and it was then rebuilt in its present form during mid-15th century. This well admired 15th century castle is situated in Kolossi village, 14km west of Limassol in the south of Cyprus.

During the 13th century, the castle served as the Grand Commandery of the Knights Templar and after the fall of Acre in 1291 the castle served as the headquarters of the knights of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem. The castle todays looks very well and well maintained and looks very similar to a tower, similar to ones found across Europe. It was built with military architecture offering security within the area and resisting any attacks. The castle has a height of 21 meters and each of the castle’s four sides are 15 meters long on the outside and 14 meters on the inside.

There is lovely view on the village from the top 🙂

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Ancient Amathus, Limassol, Cyprus / September 2017

Ancient Amathus (or Amathous) is an archeological site on the outskirts of Limassol. It was an ancient city and one of the ancient royal cities of Cyprus until about 300BC. Over time it played host to Greeks, Phoenicians, the Persians and the Romans.

Amathus is strongly connected with the cult of Aphrodite as well as having links to the legend of Ariadne.

Although is promoted widely in the area and it is number one attraction in all Eyewitness travel guide books it is waste of time. There are just piles of rocks and columns with no information at all. No visuals, no facts. Admission is €2.50 and I think they charge too much for this site. I do not recommend it at all !

They promote the place with great words:

Today, the ruins of Amathus include several ancient sites, including several tombs, an acropolis with a first century AD Roman Temple to Aphrodite, an agora, some public baths and the remains of the 8th century BC Palace of Amathus. 

However, as you could see on the pictures below, there is nothing interesting for a average tourist. I am not sure if historians would find it interesting either.

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